Wood Floor Fitter in Letchworth

Towns In Hertfordshire where we Fit Wood Flooring

 

BaldockBorehamwood - HarpendenHatfieldHertford Hitchin
Hoddesdon Hemel Hempstead - Letchworth - Potters BarSt Albans
RoystonStevenage - Ware - Watford - Welwyn Garden City

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We cover Letchworth and all surrounding areas
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Wood flooring is practical, beautiful and easy to install and maintain. Hard wood flooring offers a wide variety of design options. The clean look and feel of wood gives a sense of warmth and comfort to your home and can increase the value of your property.

 

 

 

 

We will fit your flooring whether you choose solid, high quality or engineered wood. It will be expertly fitted to the highest standard. I can fit floors anywhere, from a small room in a house to large commercial premises I specialise in all aspects including stairs and halls. I cover Hertfordshire, Bedfordshire, and Buckinghamshire as well as London

 

Solid Floors

  • Solid wood floors
  • Solid planks of wood
  • Load bearing floor
  • Longer life-span
  • Traditional floor

 

 

Solid wood floors, Solid planks of wood, Load bearing floor, Longer life-span, Traditional floor all supplied at discount, why pay more? Herts Beds Bucks  London & Manchester Contact me today

Solid wood floor is a solid piece of timber, cut from a tree milled into a plank and kiln dried; it should be installed in a moisture-controlled environment and is therefore not recommended for areas such as cellars, basements, conservatories or with under-floor heating systems.

  • Extremely durable and strong
  • Strength that compliments
  • Extremely affordable

 

Laminated Floors in Herts Beds & Bucks

 

 

Engineered wood floors

  • Layers of wood
  • More forgiving of moisture
  • Can be fitted straight away
Engineered wood floors, Layers of wood, More forgiving of moisture, Can be fitted straight away, I cover Hertfordshire Bedfordshire Buckinghamshire and London contact me today

 

Engineered wood floors have a bit more work involved as they consist of a multi-ply, cross-laid backing with a veneer top layer of a selected species and design. Therefore, due to its construction, engineered flooring is more dimensionally stable and can be installed in areas where solid wood is not compatible.The cost compared to  solid wood flooring  is cheaper because the wood finish is only on the top layer. For example, if you want an oak finish, then only the top layer is oak and the lower layers will be made of a cheaper wood such as pine.

 

I hope my brief definitions of the various wood floors you can choose has helped you to find the solution to your questions. It also demonstrates why you need an expert with 35 year experience to help you make that final decision. Contact me today for free advice and a visit to your home to provide a solution and a free quote.

 

Cutting and fixing skirting board required I cover Stevenage, Welwyn garden city, Hatfield, Hitchin, Hertford and surrounding areas. Herts, Beds, Bucks, London & Manchester Contact me today
Solid wood floors, Solid planks of wood, Load bearing floor, Longer life-span, Traditional floor all supplied at discount, why pay more? Herts Beds Bucks  London & Manchester Contact me today
window frames and stairs, bespoke kitchens and furniture. For Stevenage, Welwyn garden city, Hatfield, Hitchin, Hertford and surrounding areas contact me today

 

When it comes to choosing the décor for home or office, one of the most important elements is flooring. If you want to find a floor material that offers that extra bit of luxury combined with a practical solution,  you must go with wood flooring. When it comes to finding the most suitable wood flooring, you'll want to speak to the experts. I can offer a range of services. For a free quote and home visit contact me today.

For a free quote, please contact me today on 07778 406793 or 01438 722047

Or you can email me, or complete the onlineform.

 

Letchworth

 

Letchworth Garden City, known as Letchworth, in Hertfordshire. The town's name is taken from one of the three villages it surrounded (the other two being Willian and Norton) - all of which featured in the Domesday Book. Next to the A1 (M) and on the London rail link to Kings Cross London.

History

The Garden City was founded in 1903 by Ebenezer Howard, was one of the first new towns, and is the world's first Garden City. Its development inspired another Garden City project at Welwyn Garden City.

 
Howard's depiction of the choice of town design as a contest between three magnets In 1898, the social reformer Ebenezer Howard wrote a book entitled To-morrow: A Peaceful Path to Real Reform (later republished as Garden Cities of To-morrow), in which he advocated the construction of a new kind of town, summed up in his Three Magnets diagram as combining the advantages of cities and the countryside while eliminating their disadvantages. Industry would be kept separate from residential areas—such zoning was a new idea at the time—and trees and open spaces would prevail everywhere. His ideas were mocked in the press but struck a chord with many, especially members of the Arts and Crafts movement and the Quakers.

According to the book the term "Garden City" derived from the image of a city being situated within a belt of open countryside (which would contribute significantly to food production for the population), and not, as is commonly cited, to a principle that every house in the city should have a garden.

The concept outlined in the book is not simply one of urban planning, but also included a system of community management. For example, the Garden City project would be financed through a system that Howard called "Rate-Rent", which combined financing for community services (rates) with a return for those who had invested in the development of the City (rent). The book also advocated a rudimentary form of competitive tendering, whereby the municipality would purchase services, such as water, fuel, waste disposal, etc., from (often We) commercial providers. These systems were never fully implemented, in Letchworth, Welwyn or their numerous imitators.

A competition was held to find a town design which could translate Howard's ideas into reality, and September 1903 the company "First Garden City Ltd." was formed, Barry Parker and Raymond Unwin were appointed architects, and 16 km2 of land outside Hitchin were purchased for building. In keeping with the ideals only one tree was felled during the entire initial construction phase of the town, and an area devoted to agriculture surrounding the town was included in the plan - the first "Green Belt".

In 1905, and again in 1908, the company held the Cheap Cottages Exhibitions, contests to build inexpensive housing, which attracted some 60,000 visitors and had a significant effect on planning and urban design in the UK, pioneering and popularising such concepts as pre-fabrication, the use of new building materials, and front and back gardens. The Exhibitions were sponsored by the Daily Mail, and their popularity was significant in the development that newspaper's launching of the Ideal Home Exhibition (which has more recently become the Ideal Home Show) - the first of which took place the year after the second Cheap Cottages Exhibition.

The  ban, most unusual for a British town, on selling alcohol in public premises. This did not stop the town having a "pub" however - the Skittles Inn or the "pub with no beer" which opened as early as 1907.

Despite the ban it is not entirely true to say that there were no pubs in the Garden City. Pubs that had existed from before the foundation of the Garden City continued - including the Three Horseshoes in Norton, The George IV on the borders with Baldock, and the Three Horseshoes and The Fox in Willian - continued to operate (as they do to this day), and undoubtedly benefited from the lack of alcohol to be had in the centre of the town, as did the pubs in neighbouring Hitchin and Baldock. New inns also sprang up on the borders of the town, one such example being the Wilbury Hotel which was just outside the town's border.

This ban was finally lifted after a referendum in 1958, which resulted in the Broadway Hotel becoming the first public house in the centre of the Garden City. Several other pubs have opened since 1958, but to this day the town centre has less than half-a-dozen pubs - a remarkably low number of a town of its size. One effect of this is that the centre of the town is normally a noticeably quiet and peaceful place in the evenings.

One of the most prominent industries to arrive in the town in the early years was the manufacture of corsets: the Spirella Company began building a large factory in 1912, close to the middle of town and the railway station that opened the next year. The Spirella Building, completed in 1920, blends in despite its central position through being disguised as a large country house, complete with towers and a ballroom. During the Second World War, the factory was also involved in producing parachutes and decoding machinery. Because corsets fell out of fashion, the factory closed in the 1980s, and was eventually refurbished and converted into offices.

Another significant employer in the town was Shelvoke and Drewry, a manufacturer of dustcarts and fire engines which existed from 1922 until 1990; as was Hands (Letchworth), James Drewry joining them in 1935, who manufactured axles, brakes and Hands Trailers. Letchworth had a very diverse light industry, including K & L Steel Foundry, often a target for German bombers in World War II, the Letchworth Parachute Factory, J M Dent and Son (also known as The Aldine Press, Garden City Press).

The biggest employer was British Tabulating Machine Company, later merging with Powers-Samas to become International Computers and Tabulators (ICT) and finally part of International Computers Limited (ICL). At one time the "Tab" as it was known had occupancy of over 30 factories in Icknield Way (the original pre-Roman Road), Works Road and finally in Blackhorse Road. Blackhorse Road was built on what was the continuation of the original "Icknield Way". Upon building the new ICL building the remains of a large Roman camp was found, many articles being found and saved for display in the Letchworth Museum. In WWII a number of early computers were built in what became known as the ICL 1.1 plant.

Above information sourced from various We history sites with special thanks to Wikipedia

 

Towns In Hertfordshire

 

BaldockBorehamwood - HarpendenHatfieldHertford Hitchin
Hoddesdon Hemel Hempstead - Letchworth - Potters BarSt Albans
RoystonStevenage - Ware - Watford - Welwyn Garden City

 

Villages In Hertfordshire

 

Abbots Langley - Adeyfield - Albury End – Albury - Aldbury - Aldenham - Allen's Green – Amwell - Ansells End – Anstey –Ardeley – Ashwell - Aspenden - Aston End – Aston - Astrope - Ayot Green - Ayot St Lawrence - Ayot St Peter - Babbs Green - Bakers End - Ballingdon Bottom – Barkway -Barley - Barleycroft End – Batchworth – Batford – Bayford – Beane –Bedmond - Bell Bar - Belsize – Benington - Bennetts End - Berkhamsted - Bishop's Stortford -Bourne End – Bovingdon - Bower Heath – Boxmoor - Bozen Green - Bragbury End – Bramfield – Braughing - Braughing Friars - Brent Pelham – Brickendon - Bricket Wood - Brookmans Park –Broxbourne – Buntingford – Bushey –Buckland - Bygrave

Caldecote - Chapmore End – Charlton – Chaulden - Cherry Green – Chipperfield - Chiswell Green – Clothall - Codicote -Colney Heath - Colney Street - Croxley Green – Cuffley - Dane End – Datchworth – Digswell – Eastbury –Elstree -.Essendon – Felden - Fields End – Flamstead – Flaunden – Frithsden - Furneux Pelham

Garston – Gilston - Goffs Oak – Gosmore – Graveley - Great Amwell - Great Gaddesden - Great Hormead - Great Munden - Great Wymondley – Heronsgate - Hertford Heath – Hertingfordbury – Hexton - High Wych – Highfield – Hinxworth – Holwell -How Wood - Hunsdon - Hunton Bridge –Ickleford - Jersey Farm

Kelshall – Kimpton - King's Walden - Kings Langley - Kinsbourne Green – Knebworth – Langley – Lemsford - Letchmore Heath - Leverstock Green – Lilley - Little Berkhamsted - Little Gaddesden - Little Hadham - Little Hormead - Little Wymondley - London Colney - Long Marston – Loudwater

Maple Cross – Markyate – Meesden - Moor Park - Much Hadham - Napsbury - Napsbury Park - Nash Mills – Nettleden -Newgate Street – Newnham - North Mymms - Northaw - Norton – Nuthampstead – Oaklands - .Offley - Old Hall Green
Old Hatfield - Old Knebworth

Park Street - Piccotts End – Pirton - Potten End – Preston – Puckeridge – Puttenham –Radlett – Radwell – Redbourn –Reed– Rickmansworth –Ridge – Ringshall - Rush Green – Rushden – Sacombe - Sacombe Green - St Ippolyts - St Paul's Walden – Sawbridgeworth - South Oxhey – Spellbrook - Sandon – Sandridge – Sarratt – Shenley - South Mimms - St Stephens – Standon - Stanstead Abbotts - Stanstead St Margarets – Stapleford - Stocking Pelham

Tewin - Therfield – Thorley – Thundridge – Tonwell –Walkern – Walsworth- Waltham Cross – Wareside - Warner's End – Waterford – Watford - Watton-at-Stone - Welham Green -Well End - Wellpond Green – Welwyn – Westmill – Weston - Westwick Row –Wheathampstead – Whitwell – Widford – Wigginton - Willian – Wilstone – Woollensbrook - Woolmer Green – Wormley -Wyddial

 

 

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